Joy, Digital Photography, 2018 Tiina Alvesalo

Russel’s Winter Style, Digital Photography, 2017 Tiina Alvesalo.

Burkha Performance at city of Helsinki by Rosa Liksom, 2014 Photography by Tiina Alvesalo

Public Action Work Event at Nosturi, Snap Shot by Alvesalo

 

 

 

 

 

Public Action Event at Design Forum Shop, Photography 2013 Kai Kuusisto



Androgyny Model, Public Action No. 2, Friendship, SnapShot by 2013 Tiina Alvesalo

“It’s well known that Kumpelnest 3000, this quirky shoe-box sized Berlin bar is strictly for ‘the last drink of the night’. Principally, because after a few cocktails the garish shag pile carpet and mirrored walls blur into one confusing mass of colour.”

“Stragglers of all sexual orientations head here for a nightcap or one last drunken spin on the tiny metal dance floor. The velvet paintings and carpeted walls are fascinating after a couple of drinks, and so are the scruffy patrons apparently: it’s known as a hook-up bar.”

KUMPELNEST 3000 Lützowstr. 23,10785 Berlin-Tiergarten 

U-Bahnhof Kurfürstenstraße (U1)
Bus M48, M85 Lützowstr./Postdamer Str.

Kumpelnest 3000, Berlin, SnapShot Photography, 2013 Tiina Alvesalo

Kumpelnest 3000, Berlin, SnapShot Photography, 2013 Tiina Alvesalo

Salon Dahlman Berlin, SnapShot Photography, 2013 Tiina Alvesalo

TEASER at Salon Dahlmann Berlin, SnapShot Photography, 2013 Tiina Alvesalo

TEASER is a selection of works by the most influential young Finnish contemporary artists. Founded in 2008, the gallery Zettenberg (former Showroom Helsinki) is showing the highlights of its programme at Salon Dahlmann Berlin. Combining a critical perspective and meticulous craftsmanship with a humorous and aesthetic treatment, the works of Jiri Geller, Mari Keto, Jani Leinonen and Aurora Reinhard explore the boundaries between constructed, commercial culture and individual, materialistic addiction.

TEASER presents these prominent Finnish artists by composing a strong body of works from international private and institutional collections. By including elaborate sculptures, accusatory installations and tenacious imagery, the exhibition provokes observant attention to the prevailing phenomena of society.

The Salon Dahlmann is named after Hildegard Dahlmann, the last owner of the house. The building in Marburger Straße 3 was acquired by the Miettinen family in 2010. With the Salon Dahlmann, Timo Miettinen has established a link to Berlin’s salon culture tradition, which emerged not far from the direct neighborhood in the area of the Kurfürstendamm in West Berlin.