“It’s well known that Kumpelnest 3000, this quirky shoe-box sized Berlin bar is strictly for ‘the last drink of the night’. Principally, because after a few cocktails the garish shag pile carpet and mirrored walls blur into one confusing mass of colour.”

“Stragglers of all sexual orientations head here for a nightcap or one last drunken spin on the tiny metal dance floor. The velvet paintings and carpeted walls are fascinating after a couple of drinks, and so are the scruffy patrons apparently: it’s known as a hook-up bar.”

KUMPELNEST 3000 Lützowstr. 23,10785 Berlin-Tiergarten 

U-Bahnhof Kurfürstenstraße (U1)
Bus M48, M85 Lützowstr./Postdamer Str.

Kumpelnest 3000, Berlin, SnapShot Photography, 2013 Tiina Alvesalo

Kumpelnest 3000, Berlin, SnapShot Photography, 2013 Tiina Alvesalo

Salon Dahlman Berlin, SnapShot Photography, 2013 Tiina Alvesalo

TEASER at Salon Dahlmann Berlin, SnapShot Photography, 2013 Tiina Alvesalo

TEASER is a selection of works by the most influential young Finnish contemporary artists. Founded in 2008, the gallery Zettenberg (former Showroom Helsinki) is showing the highlights of its programme at Salon Dahlmann Berlin. Combining a critical perspective and meticulous craftsmanship with a humorous and aesthetic treatment, the works of Jiri Geller, Mari Keto, Jani Leinonen and Aurora Reinhard explore the boundaries between constructed, commercial culture and individual, materialistic addiction.

TEASER presents these prominent Finnish artists by composing a strong body of works from international private and institutional collections. By including elaborate sculptures, accusatory installations and tenacious imagery, the exhibition provokes observant attention to the prevailing phenomena of society.

The Salon Dahlmann is named after Hildegard Dahlmann, the last owner of the house. The building in Marburger Straße 3 was acquired by the Miettinen family in 2010. With the Salon Dahlmann, Timo Miettinen has established a link to Berlin’s salon culture tradition, which emerged not far from the direct neighborhood in the area of the Kurfürstendamm in West Berlin.

 

Stack Them!

BY MARK KIESSLING – Unlike the bookshelf, a pile of books is rather demanding, aggressive and always in flux.

It keeps loitering on your desk, stands in your way, gets dusty and conceals titles you may have been looking for some time or may have long forgotten. A good pile of books will keep you busy. It can be a spark of inspiration and will always remind you of something you were about to do or have done.

Going through a good pile of books is perfectly pleasurable and never a waste of time.

Since I am in the business of future readings, piles of books influence my life more than ever. I have never been a very orderly person, but since running do you read me?! it really exceeds acceptable levels. They are everywhere. Piles of samples. Piles of review copies. Piles of printed matter that promote the ones to come. Piles of readings that we decided not to include in our range, which have found their way to us nevertheless. Piles of titles that I have put aside for myself. Piles of treasures that I gathered when researching other bookstores. There are beautiful piles of books with an almost architectural appeal, and then there are ugly ones. Some you long for to go through, and some you want to get around.

Mark Kiessling is founder and co-owner of the magazine and bookstore »do you read me?! in Berlin, Germany.

 

 

Written on Sep, 03, 2011 by in

ARTEK Do You Read Me, Text by 2011 Tiina Alvesalo, Photo Artek.

Artek will establish a foothold on the German market in October 2011 in collaboration with do you read me?!. To be opened at Potsdamer Strasse 98, the new store will include a concept reading room designed by Artek together with Mark Kiessling.

Apart from a profusion of galleries, the area is becoming the place where to hunt for rare books, design and personal fashion. The new bookshop is located opposite the former printing house and offices of the legendary Der Tagesspiegel newspaper. The address is shared by the new concept store of Andreas Murkudis which has gained popularity in art and fashion circles.

The do you read me?! shop was founded a few years ago in the district of Mitte in East Berlin by graphic designer Mark Kiesling and bookseller professional Jessica Reitz. They wanted to set up a shop they themselves would like to visit.

“The idea was to create a place which would serve design professionals and graphic designers as well as everyone who loves visually rich specialty magazines and books,” says Mark Kiesling.

Do you read me?! soon acquired a cult status thanks to its rough and simple decor and handpicked selection of magazines and books. Carefully chosen titles cover a wide range of art, culture, fashion, design, architecture, photography, music, politics and business. Among the more eclectic titles on the black shelves are also familiar names like Domus, Monocle, Vogue and Selfservice.

Kiesling says people specifically visit the shop from as far away as China, United States and even Finland. “Managing director Mirkku Kullberg from Artek came first to our shop as a customer, and we got into talking about books. I especially like the history and heritage of Artek, and the furniture designed 80 years ago by a great and influential man.”

Artek has always had its roots in international communities of professionals in contemporary art, industrial design and publishing. The pioneering founders of Artek – Alvar and Aino Aalto, Maire Gullichsen and Nils Gustav Hahl – were dedicated to promoting new ideas in urban planning, architecture and applied arts.

Cooperation with a cult bookshop in Berlin is a natural continuation of this trajectory. Alvar Aalto designed many libraries and university buildings which were seminal for the development of Nordic modernism. The current values of Artek promote ethical, aesthetic, ecological and educational culture. Collaboration with the do you read me?! bookshop can only further these values.

Last June, do you read me?! and Artek joined forces at Art Basel Miami by setting up a reading room where people could relax, read books and magazines, exchange ideas and make reading lists of their favourite publications.

“The idea of the reading room and reading list was a response to people’s need to discover new titles, exchange information and learn and tell others about them. We simply ask people to name their favourite titles,” Kiesling says.

According to Kiesling, the shop at Potsdamer Strasse will be a unique combination of a small library, a research centre and a bookshop.

“Our goal is to develop and continue the reading room concept at design festivals in London and Berlin, and possibly also in connection with Artek’s contribution to the Helsinki World Design Capital 2012 programme.”

The decor of the reading room at do you read me?! will consist of Artek 60 stools, Aalto benches, unfinished Enzo Mari chairs and White table lamps. Ambient lighting will be provided by Artek’s bright light and Bilberry lamps.

Kiesling finds it interesting that Artek collaborates with young designers and projects. He thinks it’s great to see how the company has stuck to its guns in a time of volatile fashion and trends.

“Artek’s operations are extremely smart, because there is too much stuff on the market which nobody really needs,” Kiesling sums up.

Text by Tiina Alvesalo

Written on Jun, 26, 2011 by in ,

Tages Spiegel in Berlin, SnapShot Photography, 2011 Tiina Alvesalo.

Written on Jun, 26, 2011 by in ,

Andreas Murkuris, SnapShot Photography, 2011 Tiina Alvesalo

Bim at Berlin Design Home, 2011 Snap Shot Photography, Tiina Alvesalo

Written on Jun, 21, 2011 by in ,
Berlin, Do You Read Me With Artek, SnapShot Photography by Tiina Alvesalo.

Berlin, Do You Read Me With Artek, SnapShot Photography by Tiina Alvesalo.